Responding To The Pandemic

The #WildAtHome project aims to help bring people closer to wildlife in the safety of their home. Each week the Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust share ideas, inspiration, resources and information on how to stay wild whilst remaining safe at home.

"Thanks for sending these through, they’re great! Thanks all for your hard work. We’ll be in touch when we need more things with 36 hours’ notice!"

Josh Kubale , Marketing & Communications Manager

Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust

Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust volunteers manage a network of more than 40 nature reserves, covering over 1,900 acres. They are one of 47 Wildlife Trusts across the UK. This local charity has 22,000 members and is supported by people who care about protecting wildlife all of whom share a vision for an environment rich in wildlife for everyone.

We love working with them… we think what they have to say is important.

It’s never too early for Christmas

Extending Principles Into Design And Print

Designing their State of Nature Report we wanted to reflect and extend their principles. We proposed printing on Carbon Balanced Paper. It’s a simple way for organisations to reduce their carbon footprint and impact on climate change. The total amount of CO2 Balanced and land area preserved is quantified in a unique certificate which has the recognisable World Land Trust logo.

"I wanted to take this opportunity to thank you for all of your hard work. Mark, in particular: your patience, attention to detail and determination to give us a great final design made a real difference and we are very grateful for that."

Simon More , Head of Business Development and Marketing

The MBS Group

The Wildlife Trust can see that the more people care for their local environment and value the positive impact it has on their own lives, the more they’ll want to protect it from destruction and stem losses such as 97% of our flower-rich meadows and hedgehogs since the 1930’s.

In 2016 a study with 18,500 participants was conducted by the University of Derby and The Wildlife Trusts. They aimed to measure the impact of ‘doing something wild ‘for 30 consecutive days. The results were impressive, there was a scientifically significant increase in people’s health, happiness, connection to nature and active nature behaviours, such as feeding the birds and planting flowers for bees – not just throughout the challenge, but sustained for months after the challenge had been completed.  Indeed the number of people reporting their health as "excellent" increased by 30%.

We’ve compiled our top tips for charities to engage with the public based on our 15 years’ experience of working with them. We thought you’d find it useful.